North Douglas County Fire & EMS
541-836-2282
531 S. Cedar St. Drain, Oregon 97435
FIREFIGHTER

What do they do?

Firefighters are trained and given the knowledge and techniques needed to respond to a variety of natural and man-caused incidents. They utilize their training and equipment to prevent or reduce the loss of life, pain and suffering, environmental damage, and property destruction.

 

What training do they need?

The State of Oregon, through the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) certifies firefighters in a spectrum of proficiencies and levels.

Wildland and structural fire suppression, technical rescue, water rescue, steep angle rescue, hazardous materials response, and many other specialties.

 

How can I get the training I need?

NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED to get started. North Douglas Co. Fire & EMS has an extensive training program through which you can be trained and certified to many of the DPSST levels and specialties. Classes and hands-on training are provided primarily in-house through our regular Tuesday training schedule. We provide the training and apply for certifications as you progress to Firefighter 1, Firefighter 2, Apparatus Operator, Haz-Mat Operations, Incident Command, Fire Ground leader, Vehicle Extrication, and other areas of proficiencies. All this training is provided at no cost to you other than your time, energy, and commitment.

 

How do I get started?

Pick up, complete and return an application from the office or download one from the website.

Start your on-going training and skills development with us.

Many firefighters are living the childhood dream of being a REAL firefighter. Some do it as a way to start a professional career. Others that have achieved that career, do it as a way to give back to the community and agency that helped them get started. Some take pride in sharing the knowledge and skills they have acquired in challenging circumstances. Many simply enjoy the professionalism shared by these fine individuals. All are members of a special and highly appreciated group in their community.

 

Why not do it, or why shouldn’t I?

You will be challenged to learn new skills and information. You will be asked to spend time away from family and other pursuits. You will be called on to respond from your warm bed or dinner table. You will go out into the dark and stormy night. You will go into places most others fear to tread. You will witness members of your community on their worst day and they will look to you for help that may not be enough to make it ALL better.

Why do they do it, or why should I?

It’s not for everyone, but for those who can see themselves in this role, and can set their sights on getting there. The rewards can be many and the opportunity to serve unmatched. Think about the possibility that you or your neighbor’s home is on fire. Who will come to help? How long must we wait? Will they have the education, training, and experience to do the right thing? What has been done to assure they are available? In a small rural community such as ours, the financial resources are simply not available to hire the dozens of full-time firefighters that would be necessary to staff around the clock 24/7/365 multiple engine crews to respond to unscheduled events at a moment’s notice. Therefore volunteers fill this need to a great degree. Many of our firefighters do what they do simply because their community needs it.